Teams

(New Post) The Cure for the Human Heart

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619505Nothing can replace Connection.

Connecting with friends.

Connecting with family

Connecting with God.

When we stop feeling connection, we slowly shrivel up on the inside.

When we don’t experience authentic connection, people quit.  Quit marriages.  Quit Friendships.

Quit their leaders and their jobs.

Building connection with others is our lifeline.  It’s their lifeline as well.

In my humble opinion, “dis-connection” has become an epidemic:  driving people to desperately find incomplete substitutes. Resulting in broken hearts, broken bodies and broken futures.

Yet, re-connecting restores the human heart. And nothing else can do that.

Studies are now showing that addictions and self-destructive choices are often driven by our unmet need of Connection.

No one strategically chooses a life goal to eventually live in depression or addiction (food, sex or drugs) or a deep distrust of others.  This is all an attempt to heal the pain caused from dis-connection.

I watched the video below and it floored me. It explains so much about why people slip into addictive patterns to deal with personal pain.

And it presents a whole new perspective on the real cure for the human heart.

How To Fail Forward

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All of us fail.

In a difficult season several years ago, I learned that failure doesn’t have to be permanent.  We can learn to fail forward.

Here’s the difference between permanent failure and temporary failure:  Successful people fail often and learn more from that failure.

However, these two habits keep us in a never-ending failure cycle:

  • Getting good at avoiding responsibility (and therefore blaming others).
  • Acting on the urgent things in life at the expense of the important.

While it may seem like these two choices increase your chances for survival, in fact they merely insulate you from worthwhile failures.

Here are six random ideas that will help you FAIL Better, more often and with an inevitably positive upside:

  1. Grow yourself by doing hard things.  The results?  You grow both your competence and your character. You become a master at your craft.
  2. Find your “Why”. Most people get so focused on “what” they’re doing in life, they rarely focus on “why” (which is walking in purpose).  You’ll eventually become excellent at your “what” because it’s empowered and inspired by your “why”.
  3. Engage with others. Bring people along with you. If you fail, they provide support and direction when you need them most.
  4. Be really clear about what the true risks are. Ignore the non-fatal risks that take so much of our focus away.
  5. Concentrate your energy on initiatives that you can influence, but prepare for external circumstances that could derail your plans.
  6. When you fail (and you will) be clear about it.  Call it by name and outline specifically what you learned so you won’t make the same mistake twice. People who blame others for failure will never be good at failing, because they’ve never done it.

If that list frightened you, you might be getting to the heart of the matter.

If that list feels like the sort of thing you, your team, and colleagues could adopt as part of your culture, then perhaps you’re onto something……

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(New Post) 3 Reasons Why I Hired a Coach

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effort-results-graph-hand-sketching-black-marker-minimum-maximum-38763333I’ve had the privilege of serving as a leadership coach for others for several years now, but recently I began receiving coaching again for the three reasons below.

Before we get to those, in a New Yorker article titled, Personal Best—Top athletes and singers have coaches. Should you?, surgeon Atul Gawande writes, “No matter how well trained people are, few can sustain their best performance on their own. That’s where a coach comes in.

Atul continues to share how, at age 45 and at the top of his profession, he leveraged a coach to build his “expert competence” and move him into undiscovered areas of surgical development.

Like Atul, you are a “genius, at the top of your game, and highly respected by your colleagues,” so why on earth would you need to a coach to improve?

Will Rogers said, “When you are through changing you are through.”

Below are three reasons even the best high-achievers need a coach (and the benefits I received recently from several sessions with a leadership coach):

  1. Leverage a pair of outside eyes and ears. What we perceive is often quite different from how others see or hear us. The best performers look to coaches for a neutral perspective so they can view problems more objectively with less emotional attachment.
  1. Lift the “fog” and gain more clarity. Coaches help others see more clearly the path to action. They can ask just the right question or share a perfectly timed insight so that blinders come off and the coachee is able to create their own energy to execution…clarity is powerful!
  1. Make better, faster decisions. Life and work boil down to solving and acting on problems. Many of us make “emotional” or hasty decisions. Even the best lack a systematic approach for thinking through challenges. Coaches bring more rigor to the mind game while streamlining the decision-making process.

In the words of Dr. Gawande, “Coaching done well may be the most effective intervention designed for human performance.”

 

If You Hire the Wrong Person, All Bets Are Off.

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If you select the wrong team member, all bets are off.

In a previous organization, I had team members concerned that an open position was still vacant after several weeks. So I felt the pressure to hire quickly without fully examining an individual’s Character, Competency and potential Chemistry. 

The results were what you would suspect: it was evident after several weeks that they were not the right person for the role or organization. And I needed to own it because it was my decision.

We’ve all been there: you’re trying to fill a key vacancy while the work piles up. Results are being comprised. And you just want to “fix” the problem and select someone who generally is “good enough”. Instead of being careful, we speed up the process.

The worst thing you could do is hire quick. It’s the equivalent of shooting yourself in the foot – but on purpose. Because as a leaders you have to own selecting the wrong person for the role. Likely, it was your own stress that got you into this mess.

Do yourself a favor and follow these guidelines: (and trust me, I wish I had)

  1. Look for both Competence and Character. Think “And” because you need both.   Yes, you can train the right person, but if you think “either/or” you’ll compromise.
  1. If you hire and Eagle, they won’t want to work with a bunch of turkeys. Make sure your existing team is healthy. Eagles want to fly with other eagles, or they’ll fly away after awhile.
  1. Don’t Blame Them – Train Them. Every Eagle wants to grow, develop and become a better leader. So provide it! Don’t just direct – but DEVELOP. Yes, really good leaders will develop themselves. But don’t let that be an excuse not to care about someone else’s development. We all need others to challenge and stretch us.

There’s no fix for hiring the wrong person. I’ve rarely seen a team recover or have a “come to Jesus” moment and decide to fix all their own problems right after their hired.

Select the best people can. Correction: Select the best LEADERS you can. Leaders will produce other leaders. That’s how a high-performing team is built.

 

 

Are you energized by those around you?  If not, think twice.

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You are energized by the energy of others.

The people we surround ourselves with greatly influence our growth and success.

Although unavoidable, negative interactions can derail you – even stunt your progress – if you don’t know how to handle it.

And, there’s a HUGE difference in receiving feedback from a generally positive person who makes meaningful contributions to the culture and people around him or her, and receiving feedback from a truly negative person.

Negative comments from a positive person can almost always be helpful. Negative comments from a negative person is designed to tear you down.

The key is to differentiate between the two.  Here are 5 Questions to determine someone’s impact on you:

  1. Is optimism or negativity part of a pattern?

The criticism you’re dealing with is either ‘in character’ for them or ‘out of character.’

If it’s in character, then they are negative about many things in life. You just happen to be one part of the whole.

If it’s truly out of character (and they are generally a positive person), its time to listen.

  1. Do they Pass the Caller ID test?

As subjective as this sounds, the call display test is a pretty good indicator of whether a person drains you or energizes you. When you see anyone’s name come up on your caller ID, you get an immediate emotional reaction to it.

Sometimes you’re thrilled to see the name and can’t wait to take the call. Other times you’re neutral. But sometimes you wince. Whether it’s a phone call, a text or an email, you respond negatively and quietly think “oh no.”

That’s a sign that the person’s overall influence in your life has been negative, not positive.

  1. Are they “for” something, or just “against” something?

Sadly, negative people rarely know what they stand for; they only know what they stand against.

If the person you’re dealing with isn’t “for” anything positive, they likely have a negative worldview

  1. Are Compliments sincere, or are they followed by the word “but”?

A positive person (and even a neutral person for that matter) can give a compliment. Negative people can’t.

What starts out positively (“I really enjoyed the event today”) is inevitably followed by a “but” (“but had they turned the volume down and shortened the message it would have been better.”)

People who can’t give a compliment are rarely the kind of people you build the future on.

  1. Do they Add value or Extract value in relationships?

Negative people rarely give themselves to something that benefit others.

Because they are against so much, few people want to work with them. Stalled out careers, a history of frequent job changes, financial trouble and other similar markers often characterize negative people.

Honor the humanity in everyone. But you don’t have to hang around everyone.

We Need More “Craveable” Leaders. Are You In?

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the-task-of-leadership-john-buchan-quotes-sayings-picturesPeople who make a real difference lead out of Influence, not Title.

And that person can be you.

Ever wish to really add value to others?  Have more friends than you know what to do with?

It’s part of our make up to want acceptance and approval from our piers.

However, few ever fully understand the real things that make us attractive to others. This is absolutely vital as we seek to be gain influence in the lives of those around us.

Artie Davis defined the term “Craveable Leader” and shares several habits that actually make people “crave” to be around you:

  1. Listen to others’ ideas.

Nobody likes a “know it all.” So get over your own ideas, and actually become interested in someone else’s ideas. We all like to talk about ourselves and what we think. So, when we find a person who cares what we think, Bam! We love to be with them!

  1. Speak only good things about others.

Let me tell you a little secret. If you think talking about others, just the things, “you heard” is going to win you juicy friends, you are in for a world of hurt!

If you talk negatively about someone else around someone, they are going to ask themselves, “what are they saying about me?” Gossip will ruin your reputation and sabotage trust in a friendship, don’t go there!

  1. Give generously when you can.

Nobody likes a “mooch!” Don’t develop a reputation as the “cheap-o” of the group.  There is a Proverb that says “everyone is a friend to him who gives gifts.”

Generosity makes people feel valued, and not used! So always pick-up one or two more checks, bring something to dinner. Be the one everyone knows will be generous. Not an issue of amount, but rather attitude!

  1. Initiate with others.

If you are sitting by the phone, waiting for the invitation.. you are in for a long wait! Get over yourself and make the contact. I know it is hard, always feeling you have to make the first move, but that’s just the way it is.

People feel appreciated and valued when we make the first move, but don’t keep score! Just always make the move. Done!

  1. Authenticity is irreplaceable!

Don’t put on a mask. Don’t try and be several different people around different groups. You will always be found out! Be yourself. Trust who God made you to be.

If they don’t like you, you don’t need them. Find, initiate and love those who love you for you! They are the only ones that will be there when you need a true friend!

These are some things I have noticed that make me attracted to others, even makes them “craveable.”   As I reflect on areas where I am growing as a leader, I keep coming back to a few seemingly basic –yet foundational habits.

These are things I am still very much learning, so I don’t pretend mastery.  Any others you have noticed?

Stop Stealing Resilience from Next-Generation Leaders

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112514-BBK-MAR-GOS-NEG-269Over the years, we’ve seen lots of changes in both high school and college sports. Better equipment, stronger pads and helmets, even better rules to foster sportsmanship among the players.

But in my opinion, the last move made in Wisconsin is a well-intended mistake.

Author and speaker Tim Elmore commented on this decision.  He states:   “The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association stated that certain chants are officially banned at games. Now, on the surface, this rule may sound logical—such as excluding off-color remarks or profanity. But this ruling goes far beyond inappropriate language. The ban prevents chants like:

  • “Air Ball.”
  • “You Can’t Do That.”
  • “Scoreboard.”
  • “We Can’t Hear You.”
  • “Overrated.”

Why has the WIAA officially banned such words from the fans?

Well, it might hurt a player’s feelings.

They’re called “infractions” by the WIAA. The fans are not even allowed to sing the popular song, “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” song.”

Why I Don’t Agree

Yes, we need to build empathy into the values emerging leaders.

However, whenever we solve teens’ problems by getting other people to do it for them, it simply weakens their resolve. They become conditioned to look for rules from the outside to make life better. It actually fosters entitlement. Teens eventually find themselves saying, “We need a new policy,” or “It’s the school’s fault that I don’t have good self-esteem,” or “I deserve a reward, since I’m a victim.”

It’s a victim mindset that later produces an adult who looks to someone else to solve the problems he or she has internally.

We prepare the path for the child, instead of the child for the path.

Today, I am concerned we’ve cultivated such a fragile generation that they will need special rules on the job, or special favors or personal days, or special perks because they are… well, special. This is not a good thing.

 Roll Back the Tape

Tim Elmore goes on (and I agree)  “If I was a coach in Wisconsin and heard those banned chants from the crowd during an away game in a gym, I would meet with my players afterward and teach them the right way to respond to such chants:

  • Reflect – What can we learn from this?
  • Resolve – Let’s decide we won’t let it happen again.
  • Resilience – Let’s bounce back and succeed.

The WIAA gave no indication it intends to change the rules, but state representative Dale Kooyenga — a former basketball player in the system — wrote the association a letter, urging it to do so. The letter is logical and heartfelt, and the best line of his letter, in my opinion, was, “If you think a high school student section is rough, try playing basketball on a playground on the south side of Chicago.”

Let’s go build some future leaders who are ready for the real world.