Teams

(New Post) Google’s Discoveries of High-Performance Teams

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Google’s Project Oxygen created buzz several years ago when they concluded, after deep research, that the typical success of an individual employed at the tech juggernaut was based on Emotional Intelligence and not the assumed stellar STEM acumen (Science, Tech, Engineering, Math).

Now, its recent discovery about Team High-Performance also upended the team development paradigms through Project Aristotle.  The content below was quoted from their research.

First, researchers discovered which variables were not significantly connected with team effectiveness at Google:

  • Colocation of teammates (sitting together in the same office)
  • Consensus-driven decision making
  • Extroversion of team members
  • Individual performance of team members
  • Workload size
  • Seniority
  • Team size
  • Tenure

So what was the magic sauce for High Team Performance at the Tech Giant?

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If these 5 aren’t blooming on your team, first ask yourself if there are politics, egos and drama at play.

But how do you start building these into the culture of your team?   They first come from the overflow of the leader- both the immediate team director and their senior leaders.  You can even have a dynamic team leader, but the senior leader(s) directly affect the energy, focus and emotional energies of a department.

Do you make safe for your team to disagree? Be autonomous?

Do you model and value excellence?

Do your team members have a clear idea of their roles and goals?

Is their “why” (purpose) fueling their “what” (tasks)?

Do they keep a scoreboard showing impact?

For more info on Google’s Project Aristotle, read it’s Re-Work paper here

https://rework.withgoogle.com/print/guides/5721312655835136/

Three Words That Energize People

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TAOLife-C_S_-Lewis-Humility-is-not-thinking-less-of-yourself-but-thinking-of-yourself-less_I recently read an interview with Jeffrey Immelt, CEO of a small electric company called General Electric.

He was asked by host Charlie Rose, “What is the most important lesson you have learned in the last ten years as the CEO of GE?”

Without hesitation Jeffrey answered.

He said, “I think it’s humility and the curiosity that comes with it.  In other words, the big mistakes you make are when you stop asking questions, but if you’re hungry and humble and you are always digging for that extra piece of knowledge…that’s how the world works.”

While it is somewhat fashionable for CEO’s and thought leaders to list humility in leadership as one of the most desired qualities, I think there is a kernel of truth in it.

Here are the three powerful words that sum up this type of humility :  “I Don’t Know”.

Any influencer should seek to balance the “I know” – i.e. confidence in yourself, your team, your vision – with the “I don’t know”.

The “I don’t know principle”, or humility, says this:

  1. I could be wrong.
  2. What I know is not from me.
  3. Where I have arrived is not because of me.
  4. I have been given so I can give.
  5. I am not better than any other human being.
  6. I am not invincible.
  7. We are all stupid, but in different things.

It’s both scary in it’s authenticity and powerful because of it’s affect on others.

That type of authenticity and humility is magnetic and pulls people together.  And it builds HUGE levels of trust with others.

“I don’t know.”

So take the pressure off of yourself.  We don’t need to be the the smartest person in the room.

Tap into the genius of others.

 

 

 

(New Post) The #1 Reason To Be a Little Weird

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The_Voice_(Australia)I’m sitting in a hotel room, traveling for some coaching appointments scheduled for tomorrow.

I bet you can’t guess what I did right before writing this?

Is your guess “lifting weights” because I’m huge?  I appreciate that, but that’s not what I was doing.

Prior to sitting down to write this short blog post, I was watching clips of the best blind auditions on the show “The Voice.” (Did you know Keith Urban is a judge on the Australian version of the Voice? That felt like he was cheating on American Idol.)

Why was I doing that? Because I needed to get inspired to write.

I spent the day traveling from home to nice southern town in Kentucky…but it was a dreary, grey day and writing is the last thing I wanted to do.

So, I went to one of my standbys for a quick hit of inspiration, Voice auditions.

Is that a little weird? It is.

So is watching the, “How you do you like dem apples” scene in Good Will Hunting.

I do a lot of weird things, but here’s a secret. They work.  Getting motivated isn’t a science. It’s an art, a messy art.

On any given day, there are about a billion things that can bring you down.

Quarterly taxes.

Arguing about politics.

Internet trolls.

Your bank account.

That sound your car started making that you pretended was just other cars near you but you can no longer deny it.  The list goes on and on. Demotivators, not technically a word which in and of itself bums me out, don’t play fair. Why should we?

So do something weird until you get your hype back.

The truth is, it’s not weird if it works.

(New Post) Burn Out vs. Rusting Out-Either Way You’re Out

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I have a friend who is about to walk away from his $100,000+ per year job.

They’re considered a successful leader. They’re team loves them….and they get phenomenal results.

The sense of mission and passion has never waned. There’s no problem being avoided.

Why are they about to call it quits?

He’s burned out. Tired. Completely drained emotionally, mentally – and it’s now affecting his close relationships.

When good people leave, I find that key decision-makers hesitate to ask the hard questions.

Instead, we make excuses vs. making changes that would have sustained good people.

Extracting value from people is often justified because there’s a fear of someone sitting idle, “Rusting Out” so to speak, and not being efficient.

Usually the opposite is the problem….the best and brightest drive themselves so hard they go past the point of no return.

The only cure for sustainability is a restoration of energy: emotionally, mentally and physically.

If you and I truly care, it requires an emphasis on driving health along with driving results.

It’s always about relationships and results. Never “Either/Or” but always “Both/And.”

What can you do to restore your own energy levels?

(New Post) Exceptional Things Can Happen with Minimal Talent

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tumblr_n4if5dpxbs1r3t8ico1_500Einstein said “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.”

Exceptional things can happen with minimal talent.

In culture, we idolize talent, titles and temporary fame….confusing what’s exceptional with ego.

However, I’ve seen exceptional people shine when others’ have dismissed or discounted their potential.

Here are ten that have huge impact on our potential and performance:

  • Be on time
  • Work Ethic
  • Effort
  • Body Language
  • Energy
  • Attitude
  • Passion
  • Being Teachable
  • Doing Extra
  • Being Prepared

 

Real influencers are leaders before others recognize them as a “leader.

You don’t have to have a higher degree or a large “title” to impact those around you.

(New Post) When To Repair a Burned Bridge

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dsc_0044-copy-1The most commented and “liked” tweet I ever sent happened several weeks ago.

Actually, October 8th to be exact.

I was surprised, honestly, of the response on social media including my personal Facebook page.

Here’s what I said:  “I’ve decided to never burn bridges. Ever. Even if the other person attempts to pull away, seek to repair it if it’s within your power.

Now I understand.  We’ve all blown up relationships, either personally or professionally.

And, we’ve had others do something (or say something) towards us that completely destroyed the trust required to continue the relationship.

Could be a spouse, a friend, a coworker or a leader in our life.

But Bridges can be rebuilt.  

How do you rebuild a bridge you’ve blown up?

And, how do you know when you can trust the other person enough to “rebuild” the bridge?

Here are four questions to ask:

1.  Do they keep their word?  (and am I willing to keep mine?)

This is where it starts. We have to count on them (and people have to learn that they can count on us) to deliver on promises. If you commit to following up on something, do it. No excuses.

If you can’t do it, proactively let the other person know.

For example, “Terri, last week I told you that I would get back to you with a proposal. However, I am waiting for a bid to come through from an outside vendor. It looks like that might add a week to my schedule.”

People are usually very forgiving if you take the initiative to communicate. However, if they have to chase you down, you lose points. Your reputation will take a hit.

2. Do they tell the truth? (And, am I willing to be honest with them moving forward?)

This is harder than it sounds. Most of us like to think of ourselves as truth-tellers. But it’s easy to round the numbers up, spin the facts, or conveniently leave out the evidence that doesn’t support our position.

But if we are going to build trust, then we have to commit ourselves to telling the truth—even when it is difficult or embarrassing.

People are more forgiving than you think. (Witness all the celebrities who have publicly blown it, apologized, and received a pass.) They don’t expect you to be perfect. However, they do expect you to acknowledge your mistakes and to come clean when you screw up.

3.  Are they transparent and authentic? (Am I willing to be real with them first?)

People will not trust you unless you learn to share yourself, warts and all. You have to take a risk and be vulnerable. This creates rapport and rapport builds trust.

However—and be warned!—you can’t use this as a gimic or a technique. If you do, people will see it as manipulation. Instead, you have to be authentic.
The reason this builds trust is because you are demonstrating trust. You are taking the initiative to go first.

In essence, you are saying, “Look, I trust you. I am taking off my mask and showing you my true self. Some of it isn’t very pretty. But I am willing to take that risk, believing you will still accept me.”

4.  Do they Give without any strings attached? (Am I willing to give first?)

Nothing builds trust like love. What does love have to do with the workplace?

As Tim Sanders points out in Love Is the Killer App, everything. You have to be willing to share your knowledge, your contacts, and your compassion—without expecting anything in return. The more you take the initiative to give, the more it builds trust.
Giving lets others know that you know it’s not “all about you.” From this, people learn that they can trust you, because you have their best interests at heart.

Bridges can always be rebuilt.

Granted, in some situations, it can take years.

It takes doing the right things over a long period of time.

But in most cases, it won’t take that long. Relationships can be turned around quickly if both will take the steps needed  to rebuild trust.

(New Post) How You Can Be Courageous

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unknown-6Some of our Worst Behaviors are fueled By Fear and Insecurity.

However, confidence fueled By Values births Positive Energy and Engagement from others.

Consider These:

  • Grudge-holding. Forgiveness requires courage.
  • Self-blaming. Insecurity may cause leaders to blame themselves for the delinquency of others. The difference between self-blame and responsibility is corrective action.
  • Excuse-making. Insecurity prevents them from holding others accountable to their commitments.
  • Attacking and defending. Insecure leaders attack back. Rather than defending their team, they defend themselves.
  • Nit-picking. Nit-pickers are unhappy insecure people who never truly celebrate.
  • Image-protecting. It’s all about what others think when you’re insecure.
  • Fear mongering. The use of fear to motivate is an insecure leader’s method of motivation.

Boldness and Courage:

Bold action springs from either confidence or fear.  Strength drives confident leaders. Dread drives the insecure.

8 Ways You Can Demonstrate Courage:

  • Invite alternatives when you think you know. Insecurity needs predictability. Contrary to some opinions, confidence isn’t about having all the answers.
  • Believe in your ability to learn when you don’t know.
  • Exercise emotional steadiness. Stay calm.
  • Listen and make decisions.
  • Trust people to figure things out. Stay available but make space for others to solve problems. Too much help propagates insecurity.
  • Spend time thinking and planning for the future.
  • Prepare for contingencies.
  • Honor your own mistakes by sharing what you’re learning.

Confident people go further than fearful.

Successful leaders inspire boldness by instilling confidence.